Decorictionary

Types of Chairs: Different Chairs & their Evolution through History

Dining Chairs

Renaissance X Chair

renaissance-chair

(c. 1580) Ubiquitous throughout Europe during sixteenth century and usually covered in cloth or leather.

English Joined Chair

english-joined-chair

(c.1600) Lighter looking design without panelling below the seat and arms.

American Brewster Chair

american-brewster-chair

(c. 1650 – 75) Elaborate example of Windsor, or stick furniture, with turned, upright spindles both above and below the seat.

Chippendale Chair

chippendale-chair

(c. 1755) Typical example, with pierced and carved central splat, cabriole legs and freely adapted Rococo motifs.

French Chinoiserie Chair

french-chenosaire-chair

(c. 1780) Adaptation of Chippendale’s Gothic design shows interchange of ideas between designers.

Hepplewhite Shieldback Chair

hepplewhite-shieldback-chair

(c. 1788) Adaptation of Adam’s style, with its delicate shape and tapered legs.

English Trafalgar Chair

english-trafalgar-chair

(c. 1895) Regency design, typified by chair backs of two horizontal rails with cable moulding.

American Hitchcock Chair

american-hitchcock-chair

(c. 1825-30) Factory-madechair with stencilled decoration.

Thonet Bentwood Chair

thonet-bentwood-chair

(c. 1849) Light, linear development of Windsor chair, produced by bending steam-heated sections of wood.

Breuer Chair

breuer-chair

(1928) Prototype cantilevered chair, made with a single length of tubular steel.

Ponti Chair

ponti-chair

(c. 1950) Fragile-looking but tough design, refined and adapted from old, rustic models for mass production.

Fibreglass Chair

fiberglass-chair

(c. 1980) Brilliantly coloured chair by Magistretti which follows popular trend of using man-made materials.

Pila Stacking Chair

plia-stacking-chair

(1969) Space-saving chair in transparent plastic , can be folded, stacked or hung.

Director’s Chair

directors-chair

Modern version of Renaissance “X” chair , popular for its cheapness and versatility.

Occational Chairs

English turned chair

english-turned-chair

(c. 1610) Solid oak chair with triangular seat and turned support.

Louis XIV Baroque Chair

louis-14-baroque-chair

(c. 1680) Velvet-covered chair with gently sloping, high back; shows growing desire for comfort.

American Slat-Back Chair

american-salt-back-chair

(c. 1680-1710) Sensitively-turned New England chair, typical of the sturdy finesse shown in early American furniture.

Louis XV Rococo Chair

louis-14-roccoco-chair

(c. 1710-60) Good example of sinuous, relaxed contours and florid decoration so popular throughout Europe.

Transitional Queen Anne Chair

transitional-queen-anne-chair

(c. 1710-30) Legs in the William and Mary style with a gracefully curved splat, typical of the Queen Anne period.

Danish Louis XVI-Style Chair

danish-louis-16-style-chair

(c. 1775-85) French Neoclassical-style chair although decoration is simpler, using fewer curved lines.

Bergere Chair

bergere-chair

(c. 1810) English adaption of French bergere style, using can instead of upholstery.

French Restoration Chair

french-restoration-chair

(c. 1830) Typical style throughout Europe, with boat-shaped back and cabriole legs.

Early Victorian, English Chair.

early-victorian-english-chair

(c. 1835) Revival of Gothic style, in glit beech, with arched decoration.

Late Victorian, English Chair

late-victorian-english-chair

(c. 1875) Mass produced, Georgian-style chair reflects technological advance and revivalist fashion.

Le Corbusier Chair

le-corbusier-chair

(1929) Dramatic new use of tubular steel, reflects Bauhaus group’s insistence on functional design.

Barrcelona Chair

barcelona-chair

(1929) Innovative design by Mies vander Rohe, combining intersecting steel bars with leather upholstery.

Eames Chair

eames-chair

(1948) Moulded plastic chair, designed using techniques developed during World war II.

Modern Gothic Chair

modern-gothic-chair

(1980s) Simplified version of traditional Gothic style in black laquer and cane.

Light Rattan Chair

light-rattan-chair

Lightweight, adaptable design resulting from an increasing emphasis on cheapness and manoeuverability

 

Upholster Chairs

Dutch Rosewood Chair

dutch-rosewood-chair

(c. 1620) Lightly padded early armchair shows emphasis on imposing appearance, not comfort.

French Louis XIV Chair

french-loius-14-chair

(c. 1665) Brocade-covered chair with new, generous proportions and curved, Baroque-style arms.

English Winged Chair

english winged chair

(c. 1680) Well upholstered walnut chair with thick seat and back; carved legs show prevalent French influence

Winged Bergere Chair

winged-bergere-chair

(c. 1750) Beech-framed chair with classic Rococo carving; deeper, wider seats shows growing demand for comfort.

Hepplewhite Armchair

hepple-white-arm-chair

(c. 1780) Delicately-carved mahogany and brocade chair; the emphasis on elegance rather than comfort is typical of the period.

Victorian Gothic Chair

victorian-gothic-chair

(c. 1840) Sturdy mahogany-framed chair, basedon a Pugin design, reflects the movement away from english Rococo copies.

Turkish Frame Chair

turkish-frame-chair

(1880s) Internally-sprung, fully upholstered chair developed after the invention of the metal coil spring.

Art Deco Armchair

art-deco-armchair

(1930s)  The curved shape of this fully upholstered chair is typical of Art Deco design of the Thirties.

Charles Eames Chair

charles-eames-chair

(c. 1956) Innovative design in rosewood veneer with moulded plywood frame and leather-covered upholstery, mounted on a metal pedestal.

Arne Jacobsen “egg” Chair

arne-jacobson-egg-chair

(1958) Originally-shaped pivoting chair with hide-or wool-covered upholstery over a plastic shell.

Foam Chair

foam-chair

Sqyashy, cotton-covered chair, designed for comfort with its low back and deep seat.

Unit Chair

unit-chair

Versatile modular seating which can be used singly or with others to form a seating unit.

Maralunga Chair

maralunga-chair

Adaptable chair by Magistretti; balances comfort and elegance with a low back which simply folds out to provide support.

Cushioned Leather Chair

cushioned-leather-chair

Light, angular design with practical, zippered sides and comfortable foam cushions.

Settees Sofas

Early Georgian Settee

early-georgian-settee

(c. 1725) Walnut settee with gently curved serpentine back, cabriole legs and shepherd’s crook arms, typical of the period.

French “Sultane” Sofa

french-sultane-sofa

(c. 1760) Contemporary interest in the exotic, reflected in both the name and the luxurious velvel bolster.

American Mclntire Sofa

settee

(c. 1795) Typical queen Anne-style mahogany sofa with its elegant, formal lines.

Chesterfield Sofa

chesterfield-sofa

(c. 1840) Popular example of deep, button-backed upholstery which followed the invention of the wire spring.

High-Backed Sofa

high-backed-sofa

Slim, deep-seated sofa, reflects modern desire for elegance and comfort.

Cushioned Sofa

cushioned-sofa

Streamlined, practical sofa with removable suede upholstery for easy cleaning.

Modular Sofa

modular-sofa

Armless sofa, can also be joined to single chairs or stools.

Chaises Longues

Walnut Day Bed

walnut-day-bed

Good example of the period with its canepanelled and foliate carving.

Regency Chaise Longue

regency-chaise-lounge

(c. 1820) Dignified classical chaise, notable for the curving lines of the ends, back rails and legs.

Le Corbusier Chaise Longue

le-corbusier-chaise-lounge

(1927) Innovative design with adjustable frame in chromium-plated steel.

Modern Chaise Longue

modern-chaise-lounge

Elegantly comfortable combination of glove leather with modern materials – steel, moulded plastic and foam.

1 Comment

1 Comment

  1. Electra Krisha Dinesh

    December 10, 2020 at 9:25 am

    Thank you ever so for you blog. Much thanks again. Fantastic.

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